Ospery, the bird of the Selous Scouts.Selous Scouts "Pamwe Chete" title block.Ospery, the bird of the Selous Scouts.

 

"PAMWE CHETE"

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THE RHODESIAN SECURITY FORCES

 

THE RHODESIAN SECURITY FORCES STRUCTURE CHART

Rhodesian Security Forces chart.

 

THE RHODESIAN ARMY

 

The Rhodesian Army’s command structure and organization were modeled directly on the British Army. A Lieutenant-General commanded the Army and was responsible to the Minister of Defense. Later in the conflict, when COMOPS (a combined operations organization) was created, its commander exercised operational control over the Army as well as independently commanding the Army’s special forces. As Rhodesia had very limited white manpower upon which to draw for professional military service, a large part of the Army consisted of national service and reserve personnel. Initially, all regular combat units were staffed with full-time career soldiers, but after 1972, when national service was increased from 18 to 24 months, inductees were drafted into some of the Army’s special forces. In addition, many foreign volunteers, mostly from South Africa but also from Britain, the United States, France, Australia, and New Zealand, served in the Rhodesian military.

 

THE RHODESIAN ARMY SPECIAL FORCES

 

Rhodesian African Rifles

The Rhodesian African Rifles’ (RAR) two battalions were composed of black soldiers led by white officers. The black soldiers’ knowledge of tribal cultures, ability to speak various tribal languages, and bush skills enabled them to obtain local intelligence that the average white soldier could not hope to acquire and function better in Rhodesia’s harsh climate and terrain than the average urban-born and raised white tro